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SEC Filings

10-K
AGNC INVESTMENT CORP. filed this Form 10-K on 02/23/2012
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the Treasury rate, which is a monthly or weekly average yield of benchmark U.S. Treasury securities, as published by the Federal Reserve Board; or
the CD rate, which is the weekly average or secondary market interest rates on six-month negotiable certificates of deposit, as published by the Federal Reserve Board. 
These indices generally reflect short-term interest rates but these assets may not reset in a manner that matches our borrowings. In addition, we may rely primarily on short-term borrowings to acquire securities or loans with long-term maturities. The relationship between short-term and longer-term interest rates is often referred to as the "yield curve." Ordinarily, short-term interest rates are lower than longer-term interest rates. If short-term interest rates rise disproportionately relative to longer-term interest rates (a flattening of the yield curve), our borrowing costs may increase more rapidly than the interest income earned on our assets. Because our investments generally bear interest at longer-term rates than we pay on our borrowings, a flattening of the yield curve would tend to decrease our net interest income and the market value of our investment portfolio. Additionally, to the extent cash flows from investments that return scheduled and unscheduled principal are reinvested, the spread between the yields on the new investments and available borrowing rates may decline, which would likely decrease our net income. It is also possible that short-term interest rates may exceed longer-term interest rates (a yield curve inversion), in which event, our borrowing costs may exceed our interest income and we could incur operating losses and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders could be hindered.

 Interest rate caps on our agency mortgage-backed securities and agency debentures may adversely affect our profitability

Our adjustable-rate interest-earning assets are typically subject to periodic and lifetime interest rate caps. Periodic interest rate caps limit the amount an interest rate can increase during any given period.  Lifetime interest rate caps limit the amount an interest rate can increase through maturity of agency mortgage-backed securities and agency debenture securities.  Our borrowings are not subject to similar restrictions.  Accordingly, in a period of rapidly increasing interest rates, we could experience a decrease in net income or experience a net loss because the interest rates on our borrowings could increase without limitation while the interest rates on our adjustable-rate interest-earning assets would be limited by caps. This problem is magnified for hybrid ARMs and ARMs that are not fully indexed. Further, some hybrid ARMs and ARMs may be subject to periodic payment caps on the mortgages that result in a portion of the interest being deferred and added to the principal outstanding. As a result, we may receive less cash income on hybrid ARMs and ARMs than we need to pay interest on our related borrowings. These factors could reduce our net interest income and cause us to suffer a loss.
An increase in interest rates may cause a decrease in the volume of newly issued, or investor demand for, mortgages, which could adversely affect our ability to acquire assets that satisfy our investment objectives and to generate income and pay dividends, while a decrease in interest rates may cause an increase in the volume of newly issued, or investor demand for, mortgages, which could negatively affect the valuations for our investments and may adversely affect our liquidity.
Rising interest rates generally reduce the demand for credit, including mortgage loans, due to the higher cost of borrowing. A reduction in the volume of mortgage loans originated may affect the volume of investments available to us, which could affect our ability to acquire assets that satisfy our investment objectives. If rising interest rates cause us to be unable to acquire a sufficient volume of securities with yields that exceed our borrowing cost, our ability to satisfy our investment objectives and to generate income and pay dividends, may be materially and adversely affected.
Declining interest rates generally increase the demand for credit, including mortgage loans, due to the lower cost of borrowing. An increase in the volume of mortgage loans originated may negatively impact the valuation for our investment portfolio. A negative impact on valuations of our assets could have an adverse impact on our liquidity profile in the event that we are required to post margin under our repurchase agreements, which could materially and adversely impact our business.
Because we may invest in fixed-rate assets, an increase in interest rates on our borrowings may adversely affect our book value or our net interest income.
Increases in interest rates may negatively affect the market value of our investments. Any fixed-rate securities we invest in generally will be more negatively affected by these increases than adjustable-rate securities. In accordance with GAAP, we are required to reduce the book value of our investments by the amount of any decrease in their fair value. Reductions in the fair value of our investments could decrease the amounts we may borrow to purchase additional agency securities, which may restrict our ability to increase our net income. Furthermore, if our funding costs are rising while our interest income is fixed, our net interest income will contract and could become negative.
Changes in prepayment rates may adversely affect our profitability.
Our investment portfolio includes securities backed by pools of mortgage loans. For securities backed by pools of mortgage loans, we receive payments, generally, from the payments that are made on these underlying mortgage loans. When borrowers

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